Wednesday, June 12, 2019

THE CONSERVATIVE SENSIBILITY, by George F. Will

Publisher: Hachette Books (June 4, 2019)

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, an “astonishing” and “enthralling” (Booklist) new examination of how the Founders’ belief in natural rights created a great American political tradition–“easily one of the best books on American Conservatism ever written” (Jonah Goldberg).

For more than four decades, George F. Will has attempted to discern the principles of the Western political tradition and apply them to America’s civic life. Today, the stakes could hardly be higher. Vital questions about the nature of man, of rights, of equality, of majority rule are bubbling just beneath the surface of daily events in America. The Founders’ vision, articulated first in the Declaration of Independence and carried out in the Constitution, gave the new republic a framework for government unique in world history. Their beliefs in natural rights, limited government, religious freedom, and in human virtue and dignity ushered in two centuries of American prosperity. Now, as Will shows, conservatism is under threat–both from progressives and elements inside the Republican Party. America has become an administrative state, while destructive trends have overtaken family life and higher education. Semi-autonomous executive agencies wield essentially unaccountable power. Congress has failed in its duty to exercise its legislative powers. And the executive branch has slipped the Constitution’s leash.In the intellectual battle between the vision of Founding Fathers like James Madison, who advanced the notion of natural rights that pre-exist government, and the progressivism advanced by Woodrow Wilson, the Founders have been losing. It’s time to reverse America’s political fortunes.Expansive, intellectually thrilling, and written with the erudite wit that has made Will beloved by millions of readers, The Conservative Sensibility is an extraordinary new book from one of America’s most celebrated political writers.

GEORGE F. WILL writes a twice-weekly syndicated column on politics and domestic and foreign affairs for the Washington Post. He began his column with The Post in 1974, and he received the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1977. He is also a regular contributor to MSNBC and NBC News. His fourteen previous books include One Man’s America, Men at Work, and Statecraft as Soulcraft. Will grew up in Champaign, Ill., attended Trinity College and Oxford University and received a PhD from Princeton.

THE BLACK KNIGHT: AN AFRICAN-AMERICAN FAMILY’S JOURNEY FROM WEST POINT-A LIFE OF DUTY, HONOR AND COUNTRY, by Clifford Worthy (Author), Kym Worthy (Preface), John David Dingell Jr (Foreword)

Publisher: Front Edge Publishing, LLC (January 8, 2019)

Clifford Worthy, the great grandson of slaves, was one of the few African-American men of his generation who was accepted and excelled as a Black Knight of the Hudson, a traditional nickname for West Point cadets. Worthy describes his journey to West Point, the many challenges he overcame both in his family and in the U.S. Army, including service in the front lines of Vietnam.Rick Forzano, former Head Coach of the Detroit Lions praises Worthy’s memoir and his example to all of us. “He has fought his way through virtually every stage in life with his faith in God giving him the necessary strength and courage,” Forzano writes.In the late 1940s, the doors to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point were closed to most young African-American men. The few who had attended the prestigious military academy before that were subjected to relentless abuse and few survived. Why would Worthy even consider such an impossible dream? At a crossroads in his young life, Worthy took the chance of reaching out to U.S. Rep. John Dingell Sr., who had been a proud part of the New Deal in Washington D.C. and was ready to unlock closed doors. “We need to keep opening doors for other families,” retired U.S. Rep. John Dingell, Jr., writes in the book’s Foreword. “If my father had not taken that chance in the 1940s of sending a young African-American student from Detroit to West Point–Cliff would not have had his remarkable career. … As it was in the past, our country once again is deeply divided. I love this country. Cliff Worthy loves this country. I hope that this memoir will remind you of what it truly means to be an American.” Worthy’s commitment to faith, family and service included his loving support of his son Mark, who was born with developmental disabilities at a time when the boy’s disabilities were not widely understood. That part of this memoir already is inspiring readers who share that long journey with loved ones who live with disabilities. In praising this memoir, Cheryl Loveday, Executive Director of Angels’ Place in Michigan, urges families facing these challenges to read this book. “As the father of three remarkable children, it was the life and specialness of his son Mark that led Cliff to dedicate his time and his wisdom to the Angels’ Place mission–helping to provide homes and hope to hundreds of individuals with developmental disabilities.” James B. Hayes, former Publisher of FORTUNE magazine, writes of The Black Knight: “Stories of certain lives deserve to be told and preserved. They serve as inspiration for all of us and for generations that follow. Colonel Cliff Worthy’s is one of those lives.”

RETIRED COL. CLIFFORD WORTHY is the great-grandson of slaves. He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and was raised in Hamtramck, Michigan. Clifford Worthy was one of the first African Americans who was accepted and excelled as a cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point, graduating June 2, 1953. He married Lillian Elizabeth Davis on the day after his graduation and went on to serve as an officer in the U.S. Army from 1953 through 1975. He served as an Artillery officer in American posts, in Germany during the Cold War and in Vietnam just after the Tet Offensive. He participated in Operation Gyroscope after World War II and served as Battalion Commander and Military Assistant to the Under Secretary of the Army. Clifford and Lillian had three children: Kym, Jennifer and Mark who grew up with special needs. 

PORNOGRAPHY DECLARED BY SOME AS A PUBIC HEALTH CRISIS 

In May, the Arizona voted to declare pornography a public health crisis. Jim Bohannon talks about this and other issues with DR. PAUL NATHANSON, PhD, a gender relations professor who has defined the field of misandry in our culture. He is a researcher at McGill University’s Faculty of Religious Studies. His interest in the close but often hidden relation between religion and popular culture led to Over the Rainbow: The Wizard of Oz as a Secular Myth of America (State University of New York Press, 1991) and many articles on similar productions. He and Katherine Young write about relations between men and women in connection with the “secular religion” of ideological feminism. McGill-Queen’s University Press has published Spreading Misandry: The Teaching of Contempt for Men in Popular Culture (2001); Legalizing Misandry: From Public Shame to Systemic Discrimination against Men (2006); and Sanctifying Misandry: Goddess Ideology and the Fall of Man (2010). The final volume will be Transcending Misandry: From Feminist Ideology to Intersexual Dialogue.